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Using Google Images to find reusable images

Apologies for the long time between posts, but it’s been a busy couple of months and my people have been needing me!

Next time you’re looking for an image to use from Google, set your search options to find reusable images by following this example:

Perform your search:

 

Then from your search results page, select “Search tools” :

2 search tools

A new ribbon will display below and from that ribbon, select “usage rights”:

3 usage rights

A drop down menu will appear and you will need to select the re-use option that suits you.  I’m going to select non-commercial reuse because I’m going to use the image on my non-commercial blog:

Selecting that option will then filter my results to images found through Google that have been tagged for re-use.
Now click on an image you think you’d like to use; I’m going to pick this image because I like the whiskers:

pick one

When you click on the image you like, Google will give you some information about the work.  If you want to continue, you’ll need to investigate the copyright status, so click “Visit page” to check the copyright information on the source page for the image:

6 visit page

The visit page button takes me to a Wikimedia Commons page, so now I need to scroll down to find where my image is so that I can find out the copyright information:

7 wiki page1

8 wiki page 2

I click on the image and Wiki takes me to an image viewing window and while there is some basic copyright information, but I always prefer to click on the “More details” button to find out more precise information about the image:

9 more details

Now I can see that this image is in the Public Domain because it has been sourced from the U.S. Army Corps Engineers:

10 public domainWhilst I don’t technically NEED to cite the image (because it IS in the public domain), I always encourage people to cite public domain things anyway.  I encourage it because it shows others why you’re able to use the image (without them having to perform a search to see if they can find out where you originally got the work from!) and it also tells them that they can use the image too.

So this is Channel Catfish by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Public Domain] via Wikimedia Commons (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Channelcat.jpg)

Happy re-usable Google image hunting!

 

 

Other image credits:

Dwarf Corydoras by Alice_Alphabet (Public Domain), via Pixabay

Pterygoplichthys multiradiatus (Syn. Liposarcus multiradiatus) by Paweł Cieśla Staszek_Szybki_Jest (Own work) (CC BY-SA 4.0) via Wikimedia Commons

Brochis splendens by Maschinenkanone (own work) (CC BY-SA 2.0) via Wikimedia Commons

Chao Praya Catfish 70kg in the Greenfield Valley Specimen lake 2 Hua Hin Thailand by Gv-fishing (own work) (CC BY-SA 3.0) via Wikimedia Commons

Ictalurus furcatus at the Tennessee Aquarium by Thomsonmg2000 (own work) [Public Domain] via Wikimedia Commons

Drawing of a Black Bullhead by U.S Fish and Wildlife Services [Public Domain] via Wikimedia Commons

 

Discussion

4 thoughts on “Using Google Images to find reusable images

  1. Thank you. Very useful.

    Like

    Posted by Anonymous | May 8, 2015, 11:25 pm
  2. Great overview of a very important search tool!

    Like

    Posted by Brian J. Meli | May 12, 2015, 2:05 pm

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  1. Pingback: Image usage on websites and Copyright – Learning Innovations BCEL Deakin Business + Law - July 26, 2016

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